10 Clear Lakes In Colorado

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Colorado is one of a kind, filled with thousands of man-made and natural bodies of water, including rivers, streams and waterfalls. As such, choosing the best lakes in Colorado can be confusing, as everyone can choose based on their perspective. Colorado also creates opportunities for different water sports, from high mountain lakes requiring backcountry hiking to vast reservoirs located outside of major cities like Denver. Jet skiing, boating, sailing, and fishing are revered in Colorado’s lakes and are great sports year-round. Apart from the above, Colorado some lakes also offer opportunities for camping, hiking, sunbathing, picnic tables and cabins.

1. Horsetooth tank

Horsetooth Reservoir is a large reservoir located in the foothills west of the town of Fort Collins in southern Larimer County.

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Horsetooth Reservoir, locally known as Horsetooth, is a large reservoir located in the foothills west of the town of Fort Collins in southern Larimer County, Colorado. It stretches about 6.5 miles (10 km) from north to south with about half a mile (1 km) in width. The main body of the reservoir lies between several homoclinal ridges, evident in its shape and orientation. A ridge of Dakota sandstone runs along the east side, where dams plug the gaps, while two ridges backed by erosion-resistant sandstone are on the west side.

2. Blue Mesa Reservoir

The Blue Mesa Reservoir is located on the upper reaches of the Gunnison River in Gunnison County.

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Although man-made, the Blue Mesa Reservoir is the largest lake in the state and is located on the upper reaches of the Gunnison River in Gunnison County, Colorado. It was created following the construction of the Blue Mesa Dam, a 390-foot-tall earth dam built by the US Bureau of Reclamation in 1966 for the purpose of generating hydroelectric power. This lake has a maximum length of 20 miles (32 km), a total surface area of ​​9,180 acres (3,720 ha), a water volume of approximately 940,800 acre-feet (1,160.5 GL), and an elevation surface area of ​​7,519 feet (2,292 m).

3. Lake Granby

Lake Granby was created by the construction of the Granby dam.

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Boasting approximately 40 miles (64 km) of shoreline and the third largest body of water in Colorado, Lake Granby was created by the construction of the Granby Dam, which was completed in 1950. Lake Granby is famous with anglers as it is continuously supplied with rainbow trout and kokanee. Salmon. This lake is pumped via the Farr pump plant using a pipeline that empties into a channel connected to the Shadow Mountain Reservoir. Although Northern Water operates the Farr pump, the Bureau of Reclamation owns it. Lake Granby is home to the Lake Granby Yacht Club, one of the highest yacht clubs in the world at 8,280 feet (2,520 m).

4. Dream Lake

Dream Lake
Dream Lake is a high mountain lake located in Rocky Mountain National Park.

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Located east of the Continental Divide, Dream Lake is a high mountain lake in rocky mountain National Park, northern Colorado. It is located at the base of Hallett Peak, with the Bear Lake trailhead as the access point. This lake, as the name suggests, could give you a good night’s sleep with the surrounding cliffs, offering stunning views. It is a good site and a popular destination for occasional hikes.

5. Dillon Reservoir

Dillon Reservoir is a large freshwater reservoir in Summit County.

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Dillon Reservoir, otherwise known as Lake Dillon, is a large freshwater reservoir in Summit County, Colorado, United States. Dillion Lake, controlled by Denver Water, is a reservoir for the city of Denver. The reservoir includes various surrounding ski areas including Keystone, Copper Mountain, Arapahoe Basin and Breckenridge. During the ski season, many people flock to this reservoir as it is located near four ski resorts. Keystone Ski Resort, for example, is a great tourist destination about five miles away. At the same time, the Arapahoe Basin is a mid-sized resort town about ten miles away. In addition, one of the largest ski resorts in Colorado (Breckenridge) is approximately 11 km away, while Copper Mountain is located 13 km from Dillon Reservoir.

6. Reservoir of rocks

The Boulder Reservoir stores water for the City of Boulder and the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District.

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Boulder Reservoir is located in the northern part of Boulder. It stores water for the City of Boulder and the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District. The reservoir draws most of its water from the Colorado West Slope via the Boulder Feeder Channel and the Alva B. Adams Tunnel. Its stored water is useful in a variety of ways, including for agricultural purposes in Weld County and also used as part of Boulder’s municipal water supply. This 700-acre reservoir is a multipurpose water storage and recreation facility owned and operated by the City of Boulder. The Northern Colorado Water Conservation District operates it as a water supply. Boulder Reservoir serves a variety of purposes including drinking water, irrigation, and recreation (swimming, sunbathing, boating, water skiing, fishing, picnicking, biking, running, walking, and game viewing). wildlife).

7. Great Lake

Big Lake
Grand Lake was formed during the Pinedale Glaciation which occurred from 30,000 BP (before present) to 10,000 BP.

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Located on the upper Colorado River in Grand County, this Lake is the largest and deepest natural lake in Colorado. The town of Grand Lake sits on its northern shore. Grand Lake formed during the Pinedale Glaciation which occurred from 30,000 BP (before present) to 10,000 BP which led to the terminal glacial moraine creating a natural dam. The north and east inlets are the natural tributaries of the lake. They both come out of Rocky Mountain National Park, which surrounds the lake on three sides. The lake is located about a mile from the west entrance to the park. Interestingly, there was a myth, or should we say, superstitious belief, attached to this lake. Because the waters of the lake were always cold, the Ute tribe believed it to be a dwelling square for departed souls. Hence, they named it Spirit Lake.

8. Green Mountain Reservoir

Green Mountain Reservoir was built along the Blue River between 1938 and 1942.

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The United States Bureau of Reclamation built this reservoir along the Blue River between 1938 and 1942 and located it at the northern end of Summit County, Colorado. The reservoir and dam are used to store water for the benefit of the Colorado West Slope. Water is released from the Green Mountain Dam either through the hydroelectric generating station at the base of the dam or through the spillway through the dam. The Green Mountain Power Plant generates up to 21,000 kilowatts using two generators. When combined with C-BT’s five other federal power plants, they generate enough electricity to power nearly 60,000 Americans annually.

9. Lake San Cristóbal

Lake San Cristobal is a freshwater lake located in the San Juan Mountains.

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Lake San Cristobal is a fresh water lake located in the San Juan Mountains at an elevation of 9,003 feet (2,744 m) in the US state of Colorado. This lake is 2.1 miles (3.4 km) in length, about 89 feet (27 m) deep, has an area of ​​0.52 square miles (1.3 km2) and can hold up to 11,000 acre-feet of water. The name of the lake is of Spanish origin, meaning “Saint Christopher”. This lake is located near many old silver mines, so it is very clean, well maintained and populated with rainbow trout.

10. Lake Isabelle

Lake Isabel is regularly replenished by Colorado Parks and Wildlife activities.

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Lake Isabel is a reservoir that proudly displays its beauty in the San Isabel National Forest in Pueblo and Custer counties. Located in the Wet Mountains, this lake is regularly replenished by Colorado Parks and Wildlife activities like camping, hiking, fishing, and sledding in the winter.

The community of San Isabel is on the north side of the lake in Custer County. Most of the dam is on the east side (Pueblo County), while most of the reservoir is on the west side (Custer County) because the boundary between Custer County and Pueblo runs north to south across the east side of the lake.

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